Research Desk

Jul 03, 2020

 

This is a recording of the American Lung Association’s Lung Cancer Precision Medicine Summit which took place on June 18, 2020. Oncologists Dr. Erin Schenk and Dr. Ibiayi Dagogo-Jack discuss which precision medicine treatment is available for lung cancer patients and promising new research. Carly Ornstein, National Director of Lung Cancer Education, gives a high-level overview of precision medicine and discusses new resources.

Jul 03, 2020

Dr. Pasi Janne, Director of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute’s Lowe Center for Thoracic Oncology and Belfer Center for Applied Cancer Science, and colleagues discuss how COVID-19 is changing the screening, management, and treatment of thoracic cancer, including:

  • The impact on lung cancer screening
  • The role of telemedicine in caring for cancer patients
  • Managing clinical trials 
Jul 03, 2020

Artificial intelligence (AI) holds promise for enabling earlier detection of pancreatic cancer, which is crucial to saving lives. The potential of AI is showcased in a study to be presented at the ESMO World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer. Overall, 12 in every 100,000 people develop pancreatic cancer. This means that screening everyone would be inefficient and would expose many people to unnecessary tests and potential side-effects. Between 70-80% of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage when it is too late for curative treatment and five years after diagnosis, just 6% of patients have survived.

Jul 03, 2020

Breast cancer patients who are overweight or obese might benefit less from treatment with docetaxel, a common chemotherapy drug, than lean patients. An international team of researchers based this conclusion on a retrospective analysis of data from a large clinical trial.

Jul 03, 2020

Researchers at the University of Alberta have found a way to deliver anti-cancer drugs with more precision, which could increase the effectiveness of many cancer treatments. U of A oncologist Frank Wuest altered the surface of nanoparticles, which are well suited to deliver drugs, with epidermal growth factor (EGF), a peptide that binds to EGF receptors on cancer cells.

Jul 03, 2020

Cancers diagnosed early are often more responsive to treatment. Blood tests that detect molecular markers of cancer have successfully identified individuals already known to have the disease. Lennon et al. conducted an exploratory study that more closely reflects the way in which such blood tests would be used in the future. 

Jul 03, 2020

Lung cancer screening (LCS) by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) does not examine spirometry in eligible patients, but study findings published this week in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society suggest that adding this feature could improve the high burden of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema. Based on prior trial findings, LCS by LDCT has been found to significantly reduce the relative risk of lung cancer-specific and all-cause mortality by 20.0% and 6.7%. When it comes to eligibility, those who undergo LCS are typical of older age or former smokers, which are 2 of the strongest predictors of the development of COPD.

 

Jul 03, 2020

Adriana C. Gamboa et.al. conducted a study to assess the latest evidence guiding the histiotype‐specific management of extremity/truncal and retroperitoneal Soft‐tissue sarcomas with regard to surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. The researchers concluded that continued collaborative efforts will allow studies to be both sufficiently large and sufficiently focused to generate evidence that is clinically meaningful in specific Soft‐tissue sarcomas patient populations.

Jul 03, 2020

Lucy Boyce Kennedy et.al. conducted a study to focus on the toxicities of checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor T cells, including pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management. The researchers concluded that cornerstone of toxicity management is often steroids or immunosuppression, and ongoing studies are evaluating the effect of immunosuppression on antitumor efficacy.

Jul 03, 2020

Jingjing Miao et.al. conducted a study to investigate the outcomes with a reduced primary clinical target volume and radiation dose for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The researchers concluded that decreased primary clinical target volume margins and radiation doses can achieve long-term tumor control with mild late toxicities for patients with early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma.